Freitag, 24. November 2017

Circle Beret

In my part of the world it's getting colder and colder each day. When I leave the house early in the morning, a hat is just what I need to keep warm. If you feel the same, you can knit yourself this easy circle beret. It is started at the crown and increases in circles - just like the Circle Mitts I published a few years ago. Once it is wide enough you decrease and end with a few rows of ribbing.
The beginning may be a bit fiddly, but basically this pattern is suited for beginners and is a lovely showcase for selfstriping yarn. Besides knit and purl stitch you need to be able to do mk1-increases and a basic decrease (e.g. ssk).


There are two versions of the pattern text. One (longer one) exactly to the size, yarn (Aran weight) and gauge that I knitted. And a shorter one, that is written in a general way to fit different sized heads and different weight yarn. The longer version can also be used to get an idea of how the pattern works, e.g. to get you started.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.




Materials
  • one skein (50 grams) of Aran weight yarn - I used Adriafil Zebrino - or another yarn of a different weight
  • 4.5 mm circular needles (you can used dpn's, too) - or the needles the yarn calls for
  • 4 mm circular needles - or needles a size smaller than the yarn calls for
  • a stitch marker to mark the end of the round
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Techniques
  • Knitting a flat circle: Generally, a flat circle is knitted as follows.
    CO8 and join in round
    Round 1: k
    Round 2: *k1 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 2nd stitch is doubled) (-> 16 sts)
    Round 3: k
    Round 4: * k2 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 3rd stitch is doubled)(-> 24 sts)
    Round 5: k
    Round 6: * k3 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 4th stitch is doubled) (-> 32 sts)
    Round 7: k
    Round 8: * k4 mk1 repeat from * (i.e. every 5th stitch is doubled) (-> 40 sts)
    … I'm sure, the formula is clear by now, namely that you increase by 8 stitches every other row. It also means that the distance between the increases goes up by one in each of the increase-rounds. The same "formula" will be used when constructing the mitts. If you do the increases at the same spot a pattern (maybe even corners) will become visible; to achieve a look like a circle you need to start the increases at a different (randomly chosen) location in each increase row.
    Similarly, if you start with a big stitch number, you can knit a circle starting from the rim and decreasing by 8 stitches - evenly spaced - in each round.
  • Magic Ring CO: Basically, the magic ring technique (from crochet) is used to cast on knitted stitches. There are several videos on Youtube that show the technique - I used something similar to the technique shown in the first video, but since this is fiddly work, just use the one that suits you best.
However, if the Magic Ring CO is too fiddly for you, you can alternatively just CO 8 sts and join them in the round. Later, you can use the tail of your CO to close the open loop, by pulling it through the CO stitches and draw them closed.


Gauge, Size and What you Need to Measure
The pattern is written in a way that it can be adapted to any head size. I measured the circumference of my head and - on a beret that fitted me well - the diameter when it lay flat, i.e. at its widest point.
Since you start from the inside out - you can knit (and increase) until you reach the desired diameter and then knit on (and decrease) until you reach your head circumference. Therefore you don't really have to swatch.
If you want to knit the exact same beret that I knitted. Here are my numbers:

  • Gauge in stockinette stitch: 18 sts = 10 cm in width, 25 rows = 10 cm in height
  • Diameter at the widest point = 26 cm, i.e. 81 cm of circumference
  • Diameter at ribbing = 16 cm, i.e. a diameter of about 50 cm, since the ribbing stretches it fits my head circumference (55 cm).


Instructions

Short Version - to Fit any Size of Head and Weight of Yarn
This version will definitely work for you, if you've knitted a flat circle before (e.g. the Circle Mitts or the Zoom Out Fingerless Gloves).

Do a magic loop CO of 8 stitches. Your piece should now look similar to illustration 1 - see below.
Distribute the sts on the bigger needles (4.5mm) needles and knit one round. Now it should look like illustration 2. Place a stitch marker.

Alternate one round with circle increases (8 increases per round - started at a random point, but distributed evenly) with one knit-only round - until the piece has the circumference/diameter you want.
(I did this a total of 15 increase rounds, this means that I had 120 sts on my needles - I was about 7 cm short of my intended diameter).

Then - to create a bit of a slope - alternate one round of circle increases with two knit only rounds.
(I did this 3 times, i.e. afterwards I had a total of 144 sts on my needles -  the diameter was about 24 cm then.)

Then knit two knit-only rounds - without any increases or decreases.
Then alternate one round of circle decreases (8 decreases per round - started at a random point, but distributed evenly) with one knit-only round - until the inner edge fits snugly around your head.
(I did a total of 8 decrease rounds, i.e. I had 80 sts on my needles before I started the ribbing.)

With the smaller needles (4mm) knit 7 round of k2p2-ribbing. Loosely bind off in pattern in round 8.



Long Version - Exactly to my Gauge and Size
With your 4.5mm needles do a magic loop CO of 8 sts. - If this is too fiddly, you can alternatively just CO 8 sts and join them in the round. You can use the tail to close the open loop, by pulling it through the CO stitches and draw them closed. The piece should look similar to illustration 1.
Distribute the stitches on your 4.5mm needles and knit one round. Place a marker at the end of the round. Now your piece should look simlar to illustration 2.
Round 2: kbf all - now you have a total of 16 sts
Round 3: k all

Illustrations - click to enlarge


Round 4: * k1, mk1, k1 repeat from * to end - now you have a total of 24 sts
Round 5: k all
Round 6: * k3, mk1 repeat from * to end -> 32 sts
Round 7: k all
Round 8: * k1, mk1, k4 repeat from * to end -> 40 sts
Round 9: k all
Round 10: * k4, mk1, k1 repeat from * to end -> 48 sts
Round 11: k all
Round 12: * k2, mk1, k4 repeat from * to end ->  56 sts
Round 13: k all
Round 14: * k6, mk1, k1 repeat from * to end -> 64 sts
Round 15: k all - now your piece should look similar to illustration 3.
Round 16: * mk1, k8 repeat from * to end ->  72 sts
Round 17: k all
Round 18: * k4, mk1, k5 repeat from * to end ->  80 sts
Round 19: k all
Round 20: * k8, mk1, k2 repeat from * to end -> 88 sts
Round 21: k all
Round 22: * k2, mk1, k9 repeat from * to end -> 96 sts
Round 23: k all
Round 24: * k5, mk1, k7 repeat from * to end -> 104 sts
Round 25: k all
Round 26: * k10, mk1, k3 repeat from * to end ->  112 sts
Round 27: k all
Round 28: * k1, mk1, k13 repeat from * to end ->  120 sts
Round 29: k all
Round 30: k all
Round 31: * k10, mk1, k5 repeat from * to end ->  128 sts
Round 32: k all
Round 33: k all
Round 34: * k10, mk1, k5 repeat from * to end -> 136 sts
Round 35: k all
Round 36: k all
Round 37: * k6, mk1, k10 repeat from * to end ->  144 sts
Round 38: k all
Round 39: k all
Round 40: * k1, ssk, k15 repeat from * to end ->  136 sts
Round 41: k all
Round 42: * k10, ssk, k5 repeat from * to end ->  128 sts
Round 43: k all
Round 44: * k6, ssk, k8 repeat from * to end ->  120 sts
Round 45: k all
Round 46: * k12, ssk, k1 repeat from * to end -> 112 sts
Round 47: k all
Round 48: * k2, ssk, k10 repeat from * to end -> 104 sts
Round 49: k all
Round 50: * k11, ssk repeat from * to end ->  96 sts
Round 51: k all
Round 52: * k3, ssk, k7 repeat from * to end -> 88 sts
Round 53: k all
Round 54: * k8, ssk, k1 repeat from * to end -> 80 sts

Change to 4mm needles and do 7 rounds of k2p2-ribbing. Bind off loosely in pattern in round 8.

Weave in ends. 

Freitag, 17. November 2017

U-Turn Hat

While participating in an open KAL hosted by the facebook group "Die Drei vom Blog - Knitalong", I designed a few new hats. This is the 3rd one I knitted ... but the first that has its pattern written down :) It is knitted flat from side to side and completely without short rows.
It starts similar to the U-Turn Mitts or the U-Turn Slippers. has semicircular increases to shape the dome over your head, decreases for the slope on the other side and is finished with a three-needle bind-off. Because of its unique construction, it's great to show off your variegated or self-striping yarn.


The pattern contains one stitch-by-stitch version for exactly the same size that I knitted, an explanation on how to adapt it to a different sizes or different weights of yarn, and a generic version of the pattern.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • about 50 grams of fingering weight yarn
  • 3.25mm needles - I used circulars with an 80 cm cord
  • three stitch markers
  • a third knitting needle for the three needle BO
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Techniques & Notation
  • Judy's Magic Cast-On is a technique that gives you live stitches on both sides of your needle - it is generally used for toe-up socks (e.g. in this pattern), but it can be used for other purposes as well. Here's a written description (from Knitty) and here's a YouTube-video by Cat Bordhi and another YouTube-video by Very Pink Knits.
  • Three-Needle Bind-Off: https://youtu.be/Ph93jWSzTa0
  • Knitting a flat circle - or in case of this pattern a semicircle: The technique for knitting a flat circle has been described a few times on this blog, e.g. in the "Zoom Out Mitts"-Post. Basically it consists of doing 8 increases (evenly spaced out in one round) every other row, and varying the starting point for the first increase to avoid an octagon pattern. 
    In this pattern only a semicircle is knitted. This means that there will be only 4 increases on every RS row - and they will be started at a random stitch within the first quarter of the half circle.
    As an increase I used kfb and as decrease I used ssk, but you can use other stitches as well, e.g. a make 1 knit stitch (mk1) as increasing stitch (which may look a bit neater) or a k2tog as a decrease stitch.
  • [X]*Y, means, knit the sequence in brackets (X) Y times, e.g. [k2. kfb]*3 means knit the sequence "k2, kfb" three times.



Gauge and Size
In garter stitch 11 ridges (=22 rows) gave 5 cm in height, and 12 sts gave 5 cm in width.
The finished piece has about 48 to 50 cm of circumference (at the lower edge - ribbing) and is 23 cm high. However, the ribbing stretches easily to 56 cm circumfernce.
I'd advise you to measure the circumference of the intended wearer's head as well as the wished height of the crown.


Construction
Knitted flat an in a U-shape around the first magic CO. Each row consists of a garter stitch part (ribbing - at the beginning and end of each row) and a semicircular bit around the turning point of the U. The slope is achieved by changing the number of increases and decreases. See schematic below.

Construction - click to enlarge

First there will be 4 decreases every 2nd row, which basically creates a semicircle above the ribbing. Then only 3 increases will be made, then only 2, then only 1 and finally there will be a few rows without any increases at all.
Once you've reached the middle of your piece, you will knit the same backwards, i.e. there will be decreases instead of increases. That means you start with no decreases, then switch to 1 decrease every 2nd row, then 3 decreases every 2nd row and finally 4 decreases every 2nd row. Until there are only 2x20 stitches left. The piece is finished with a three-needle BO.
The letters in the schematic refer to the parts of the pattern instructions below.




Instructions
These are the specific instructions for a hat with the same yarn weight, same gauge and same size that I knitted. If you'd like to adapt the pattern, see "How to Adapt to Another Head Size - or Generic Instructions" below.

Do a magic CO of 2x20 stitches, i.e. you have 20 sts on each needle
Now turn your needles around in a way that you're looking at the garter stitch bumps.
All rows of the tip will be knitted in a U-shape, i.e. you knit the stitches on the first needle turn the piece upside down (this point will be called turning-point ("TP") and knit the stitches on the other needle. Then you turn your knitting to the WS and knit back.

Part A
Row 1 (WS): k18, place marker, p2, TP, p2, place marker, k18 - the markers will separate the ribbing from he upper (sloped) part.
Row 2 (RS): sl1, k17, [kfb]*4, k18 - your piece will look similar to picture 1 - the U-shape will not yet be visible
Row 3 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p4, TP, p4), k18
Row 4 (RS): sl1, k17, [k1, kfb]*4, k18
Row 5 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p6, TP, p6), k18
Row 6 (RS): sl1, k17, [kfb, k2]*4, k18
Row 7 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p8, TP, p8), k18
Row 8 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, kfb, k1]*4, k18
Row 9 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p10, TP, p10), k18 - now your piece will look roughly like photo 2; the inverted U will start to become visible.
Row 10 (RS): sl1, k17, [k1, kfb, k3]*4, k18
Row 11 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p12, TP, p12), k18
Row 12 (RS): sl1, k17, [k4, kfb, k1]*4, k18
Row 13 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p14, TP, p14), k18
Row 14 (RS): sl1, k17, [kfb, k6]*4, k18
Row 15 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p16, TP, p16), k18
Row 16 (RS): sl1, k17, [k4, kfb, k3]*4, k18
Row 17 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p18, TP, p18), k18 
Illustrations

Part B
From now on, there will be only 3 increases in every RS row.
Row 18 (RS): sl1, k17, [k6, kfb, k5]*3, k18
Row 19 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p39), k18
Row 20 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, kfb, k10]*3, k18
Row 21 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p42), k18
Row 22 (RS): sl1, k17, [k10, kfb, k3]*3, k18
Row 23 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p45), k18
Row 24 (RS): sl1, k17, [k1, kfb, k13]*3, k18
Row 25 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p48), k18
Row 26 (RS): sl1, k17, [k11, kfb, k4]*3, k18
Row 27 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p51), k18
Row 28 (RS): sl1, k17, [k5, kfb, k11]*3, k18
Row 29 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p54), k18
Row 30 (RS): sl1, k17, [k13, kfb, k4]*3, k18
Row 31 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p57), k18
Row 32 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, kfb, k16]*3, k18
Row 33 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p60), k18
A few rows into part B, your piece should look similar to illustration 3.

Depending on the length of your circular needles, you may switch from magic loop to just knitting without a piece of cord sticking out. When I reached that point, I put a stitch marker at the TP - this makes it easier to count your stitches if you want to make sure that you've increased/decreased correctly.

Part C
From now on there will be only 2 increases in every RS row.
Row 34 (RS): sl1, k17, [k20, kfb, k9]*2, k18
Row 35 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p62), k18
Row 36 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, kfb, k29]*2, k18
Row 37 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p64), k18
Row 38 (RS): sl1, k17, [k10, kfb, k21]*2, k18
Row 39 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p66), k18
Row 40 (RS): sl1, k17, [k25, kfb, k7]*2, k18
Row 41 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p68), k18
Row 42 (RS): sl1, k17, [k13, kfb, k20]*2, k18
Row 43 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p70), k18

Part D
From now on there will only be 1 increase in every RS row.
Row 44 (RS): sl1, k17, k27, kfb, k to next marker, k18
Row 45 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p71), k18
Row 46 (RS): sl1, k17, k53, kfb, k to next marker, k18
Row 47 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p72), k18
Row 48 (RS): sl1, k17, k32, kfb, k to next marker, k18
Row 49 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p73), k18
Row 50 (RS): sl1, k17, k39, kfb, k to next marker, k18
Row 51 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p74), k18

Parts E
From now on, there will be no increases
Row 52 (RS): sl1, k to end
Row 53 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p74), k18
Measure the lower edge of the piece (at the garter stitch ribbing) when stretched comfortably. Check whether it measures half of your head circumference.

Part F (mirrors part E)
Row 54 (RS): sl1, k to end
Row 55 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p74), k18

Part G (mirrors part D)
One decrease per RS row.
Row 56 (RS): sl1, k17, k38, ssk, k to next marker, k18
Row 57 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p73), k18
Row 58 (RS): sl1, k17, k31, ssk, k to next marker, k18
Row 59 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p72), k18
Row 60 (RS): sl1, k17, k52, ssk, k to next marker, k18
Row 61 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p71), k18
Row 62 (RS): sl1, k17, k26, ssk, k to next marker, k18
Row 63 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p70), k18

Part H (mirrors part C)
Two decreases per RS row.
Row 64 (RS): sl1, k17, [k13, ssk, k20]*2, k18
Row 65 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p68), k18
Row 66 (RS): sl1, k17, [k25, ssk, k7]*2, k18
Row 67 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p66), k18
Row 68 (RS): sl1, k17, [k10, ssk, k21]*2, k18
Row 69 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p64), k18
Row 70 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, ssk, k29]*2, k18
Row 71 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p62), k18
Row 72 (RS): sl1, k17, [k20, ssk, k9]*2, k18
Row 73 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p60), k18

Part I (mirrors part B)
Three decreases per RS row.
Row 74 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, ssk, k16]*3, k18
Row 75 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p57), k18
Row 76 (RS): sl1, k17, [k13, ssk, k4]*3, k18
Row 77 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p54), k18
Row 78 (RS): sl1, k17, [k5, ssk, k11]*3, k18
Row 79 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p51), k18
Row 80 (RS): sl1, k17, [k11, ssk, k4]*3, k18
Row 81 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p48), k18
Row 82 (RS): sl1, k17, [k1, ssk, k13]*3, k18
Row 83 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p45), k18
Row 84 (RS): sl1, k17, [k10, ssk, k3]*3, k18
Row 85 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p42), k18
Row 86 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, ssk, k10]*3, k18
Row 87 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p39), k18
Row 88 (RS): sl1, k17, [k6, ssk, k5]*3, k18
Row 89 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p36), k18

Part J (mirrors part A)
Four decreases per RS row.
Row 90 (RS): sl1, k17, [k4, ssk, k3]*4, k18
Row 91 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p32), k18 
Row 92 (RS): sl1, k17, [kfb, ssk]*4, k18
Row 93 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p28), k18
Row 94 (RS): sl1, k17, [k4, ssk, k1]*4, k18
Row 95 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p24), k18
Row 96 (RS): sl1, k17, [k1, ssk, k3]*4, k18
Row 97 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p20), k18
Row 98 (RS): sl1, k17, [k2, ssk, k1]*4, k18
Row 99 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p16), k18
Row 100 (RS): sl1, k17, [ssk, k2]*4, k18
Row 101 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p12), k18
Row 102 (RS): sl1, k17, [k1, ssk]*3, k1, k2tog, k18 - I chose a k2tog (instead of an ssk as the 4th decrease, to get a clean edge towards the garter stitch ribbing)
Row 103 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p8), k18
Row 104 (RS): sl1, k17, [kfb]*3, k2tog, k18
Row 105 (WS): sl1, k17, p to next marker (i.e. p4, TP, p4), k18

Now there should be the same number of stitches left that you started with, i.e. 2x20.
Turn inside out, hold right sides together and do a three needle BO of the last stitches (see illustration 4).

Weave in ends and turn back right sides out.


How to Adapt to Another Size 

If you have different gauge, have a different size head or use different yarn altogether, you can adapt the pattern to your size. Basically, you can adapt two things:
  • the number of stitches on both ends that are knitted in garter stitch and that form the ribbing - the height of your ribbing - and
  • the number of rows with 4 in/decreases, 3 in/decreases, 2 in/decreases, 1 in/decrease and no increase - this changes the shape of the slope.
If you'd like a shorter/longer ribbing or use different yarn, I'd suggest that you cast on fewer/more stitches with the magic CO. On each needle, you need the intended number of ribbing stitches plus 2.

I'd suggest that of the total number of rows you need to reach the middle of the piece,
  • you use about 1/3 for RS rows with 4 in/decreases
  • about the same number for RS rows with 3 in/decreses
  • about 1/6 for RS rows with 2 in/decreases
  • you devide the remaining rows equally into rows 1 in/decrease and no in/decrease. 
As you can see in the instructions above - for me it was a total of 26 rows to reach the middle, 8 of which with 4 increases, 8 with 3 increases, 5 with 2, and 4 with 1 increase - which is roughly the distribution above. 
When you change from 4 increases to 3 increases, it's possible that you have a stitch count between the markers, that is not divisible by 3. In this case, you need to distribute the new increases as evenly as possible throughout the stockinette stitches. The same goes for all other changes in the number of in/decreases.

For a wider circumference, you can just add a few rows, without any increases or decreases in the middle of the piece. For a higher dome, do more rows with 4 and 3 increases, and fewer with 2 and 1 increases.

Important: With all adjustments, make sure to knit two equal halves, i.e. do the same decreases during the 2nd half then you did increases during the 1st. That's why I'd advise to take notes of the knitted rows.



Generic Instructions

With magic CO cast on the number of stitches you want for the ribbing plus 2 to start the semicircle increases and all of that on both sides of the needles (i.e. calculated number of stitches times two).

So your first row after the magic CO would be;
Row 1 (WS): k to 2 bef turning point ("TP"), place marker, k2, then turn, k2, place marker, k to end

Part A
You start with a few rows with 4 increases per RS row, ie.
Row 2 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker evenly distribute 4 increases (e.g. kfb) among your knit stitches - starting from a random stitch during the first quarter, slip marker, k to end
Row 3 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat rows 2 and 3 until you've reached about a third of half your circumference
Important: Take notes of the number of repeats that you work for all parts. You'll need these numbers to do an equal amount of decrease rows.

Part B
Now you change to only 3 increases per RS row, i.e.
Row 4 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker evenly distribute 3 increases among your knit stitches - starting from a random stitch during the first third, slip marker, k to end
Row 5 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat rows 4 and 5 until you've reached about two thirds of half your circumference - so roughly the same number of repeats in part A.
Also, take a note of the number of rows you worked with 3 increases.

Part C
Then you switch to 2 increases per RS row.
Row 6 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker evenly distribute 2 increases among your knit stitches - starting from a random stitch during the first half, slip marker, k to end
Row 7 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat these rows about a half of the repeats of part A.

Part D
Then you switch to 1 increases per RS
Row 6 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker randomly do 1 increase among your knit stitches, slip marker, k to end
Row 7 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat these rows for about half of the remaining rows until you've reached half of your circumference

Part E
Then to switch to no increases.
Row 8 (RS): sl1, k to end
Row 9 (WS): sl1, k to end
Repeat these rows until you've reached half of the intended circumference

Now you start the second half, ad you basically knit the mirror image of the first.

Part F
First the rows with no increases:
Row 10 (RS): sl1, k to end
Row 11 (WS): sl1, k to end
Repeat the rows the same number of times as in part E.

Part G
Only one decrease per RS row.
Row 12 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker randomly do 1 decrease (eg. ssk) among your knit stitches, slip marker, k to end
Row 13 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat these rows the same number of times as the rows in part D.

Part H
Two decreases per RS row.
Row 14 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker evenly distribute 2 decreases among your knit stitches - starting from a random stitch during the first half, slip marker, k to end
Row 15 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat rows the same number of time as the rows of  part C

Part I
Three decreases per RS row.
Row 16 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker evenly distribute 3 decreases among your knit stitches - starting from a random stitch during the first third, slip marker, k to end
Row 17 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat rows 16 and 17 the same number of times as the rows of part B

Part J
And towards the end, four decreases per RS row.
Row 18 (RS): sl1, k to marker, between here and the next marker evenly distribute 4 decreases (e.g. kfb) among your knit stitches - starting from a random stitch during the first quarter, slip marker, k to end
Row 19 (WS): sl1, k to marker, p to next marker, k to end
Repeat rows 18 and 19 the same number of times as the rows of part A.

Now there should be the same numer of stitches that you started with.
Turn inside out, hold right sides together and do a three needle BO of the last stitches.

Weave in ends, turn back right sides out and enjoy wearing your hat.

U-Turn Hat and U-Turn Mitts

Donnerstag, 9. November 2017

Sankaku Wrist Warmers in Crochet

Currently, there are roughly 100 knitting patterns available on my blog. Some of them have been quite successful, but others haven't ... and there are even some that I had nearly forgotten. One of these is the Triangulation Wrist Warmers knitting pattern that I published about four years ago.
So I was really surprised when I received an e-mail from a German knitter who had tried to translate it and had stumbled upon some blatant mistakes that I made when I wrote the pattern. However, she was so nice as to put them into very diplomatic questions. 
That made me review the whole pattern and correct a lot of the mistakes. ... And this activity made me think of the pattern again and gave the idea of doing something similar in crochet. Et volià - here it is. 
These wrist warmers are one in one piece - starting from the outside of the wrist and finished at the thumb. Like their knitted cousins, they are nice to showcase your variegated yarn.
I made these with fingering weight yarn. However, most of the pattern is written in a way that you can adapt it to other yarn weights as well. 


As to the name, Sankaku (三角) is the Japanese word for triangle.

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This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • about 45 grams of fingering weight yarn (I used Lang Jawoll Magic, because I like the effect of the color variations)
  • a 3mm crochet hook
  • three removable stitch markers - one different from the others (safety pins work as well)
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Gauge or What to Measure
If you're knitting for your own hands, you just have to try it on a few times before finishing. If you're knitting for somebody else, you'll need the following measurements:
  • hand circumference at wrist height or a bit lower - depending on how long you want your wrist warmers
  • total height of the wrist warmers - from the point where you measured the lower circumference to just below your hand knuckles
  • hand circumference just below knuckle height
  • thumb circumference
As with many of my patterns, it is written in a way that you can adjust it to your hand size and won't include exact stitch counts but rather you'd be asked to continue until something is wide enough to fit around your hands or similar. If you're uncomfortable with instructions like that, the pattern might not be for you.

However, I will give you an example of the wrist warmers I crocheted in purple.
The wrist warmers I made measured 17 cm in height and had about 19 cm circumference at the lower edge.



Abbreviations and Stitches

Construction
Construction
One mitt is worked in one piece - and in five parts as shown in the picture on the right.
Part 1 is started with two stitches only and worked back and forth with increases in the middle and on the sides to make up a triangle.
Part 2 is worked in the round - BUT, you will be changing directions after every row, i.e. one row is worked from the outside and the next from the inside of the piece. There are increases at the outer edge and decreases at the inner edge of the mitt.
Part 3 is worked back and forth around the inner edge of the hand and creating an open edging at the top.
Part 4 is started with a chain above the thumb and then worked in the round - but again changing directions after each round. The stitch count is decreased to fit snugly around your thumb.
Part 5 (the thumb) is the only part that is truely worked in the round without altering the crocheting direction.


Instructions

NOTE 1: all increase and decrease stitches in this part are crocheted through the back loop of the underlying stitch only.

Part I - Worked Flat
Row 1: ch2, 1 tc
Row 2: inc, inc, 1 tc
Row 3: inc, inc, place marker (will be called top marker), inc, inc, 1 tc
Row 4: inc, sctbl to top marker, inc, inc, sctbl to 1 bef end, inc, 1 tc
Repeat row 4 until the lower edge of the triangle is wide enough to fit around your wrist. Don't work the last turning chain. Your piece will now look similar to illustration 1.

For me the piece was wide enough after row 16, that means that I had a total of 64 stitches - or 32 per slope of the triangle.

NOTE 2: As to the handling of the stitch markers for increases around a point: in crochet, it's difficult to place a stitch marker between two stitches, so I'd do as follows: when I reached the point where the two increases were to be worked, I removed the marker, did the two increases and afterwards place the marker into the first stitch of the second increase. That way, after turning my work, the stitch marker would mark the first stitch into which I had to increase in the next row.

NOTE 3: During part I, your stitch count will increase by 4 sts in each row - or by 2 sts per slope of the triangle. I.e. the number of sctbls between in increases also increases by 2 sts per row (on each slope). So, if you prefer not to use stitch markers, you can count your sctbl stitches from beginning increase to middle increase. In row 4, there are 2 sts, in row 5 4 sts, in row 6 6 sts, in row 7 8 sts and so on.



Part II
Fold the piece around the middle (see illustration 2) and attach the two lower tips of the triangle to each other with a slip stitch. Place a marker here (will be called lower marker). Work a turning chain and turn work.
Row 1 (inside): dec, sctbl to top marker, inc, inc, sctbl to 2 bef lower marker, dec, connect to first dec of the row with slip stitch, tc and turn
Row 2 (outside): dec, sctbl to top marker, inc, inc, sctbl to 2 bef lower marker, dec, connect to first dec of the row with slip stitch, tc and turn
Repeat rows 1 and 2 until the edge of the top marker (i.e. the longer side edge) is as high as you want the mitt to be. DON'T TURN after the last row.

For me this was the case after 9 repeats or 18 rows.

NOTE 4: The change of direction after each row is done to keep the texture of the sctbl-rows.

NOTE 5: Stitch marker handling for the decreases ...

NOTE 6: During part II, each row has the same number of increases than decreases. That means that your stitch count stays the same.
Illustrations (click to enlarge)
Part III
From now on the working direction will change, from around the top marker, to around the lower marker. To keep the texture of the piece, the next row should be started at the top marker - however, the working yarn currently is at the lower marker.
If you're not averse to cutting yarn in the middle of a project, cut your yarn and attach it at the upper marker for row 1 of part III. If you're like me (and want to avoid weaving in more ends at any cost), you can cheat a bit and do slip stitches on the inside (or just through the back loop of the current row) to the top. Once you crochet back tbl from the inside, these slip stitches will be hidden. When you've reached the top marker turn with a turning chain.

Row 1 (inside): dec, sctbl. to 1 bef lower marker, dec, dec, sctbl to 1 bef top marker, dec, tc
Row 2 (outside): dec, sctbl. to 2 bef end, dec, tc

Remove the top marker after these rows.
After row 1 your piece should look similar to illustration 3.

Row 3 (inside): dec, sctbl. to 2 bef end, dec, tc
Row 4 (outside): dec, sctbl. to 2 bef end, dec, tc

NOTE 7: Rows 2 to 3 don't have decrases around the lower marker, i.e. the wrist warmers will get wider at this point. This widening makes a sort of thumb gusset. If you feel - while working part III - that you need more room to accomodate the widening of your hands, you can always do another row 3 or 4 instead of a row 5 or 6.

Row 5 (inside): dec, sctbl. to 1 bef lower marker, dec, dec, sctbl to 2 bef end, dec, tc
Row 6 (outside): dec, sctbl. to 1 bef lower marker, dec, dec, sctbl to 2 bef end, dec, tc

Repeat rows 5 and 6 until the upper edge covers about 75% of the hand circumference just below your knuckles.

For me this was the case after 12 rows.


Part IV 
Now the opening above the thumb needs to be closed. This is done by crocheting a chain from one of the upper edges to the other. (See illustrations 4 and 5).

Chain: place a marker (called marker 1) chain 10 and connect this chain to the other edge with a slip stitch, tc and turn, place a marker here as well (called end marker, since it marks the end of a round)
Try on the wrist warmer to see whether it fits or measure whether the total upper circumference is equal to the measurement you took. It should fit comfortably. If it's too tight or too wide, adjust the number of chain stitches accordingly.

Round 1 (inside): sc to 2 bef marker 1, dec, dec, sctbl to 1 bef lower marker, dec, dec, sctbl to 2 bef end marker, dec, connect to first stitch of that round with slip stitch, tc and turn
Round 2 (outside): dec, sctbl to 1 bef lower marker, dec, dec, sctbl to 1 bef marker 1, dec, dec, sctbl to 1 bef end marker, dec, connect to first stitch of that round with slip stitch, tc and turn

After these rounds your piece should look similar to illustration 6.
Round 3 (inside): dec, sctbl to 2 bef marker 1, dec, dec, sctbl to 1 bef lower marker, dec, dec, sctbl to 2 bef end marker, dec, connect to first stitch of that round with slip stitch, tc and turn
Round 4 (outside): dec, sctbl to 1 bef lower marker, dec, dec, sctbl to 1 bef marker 1, dec, dec, sctbl to 1 bef end marker, dec, connect to first stitch of that round with slip stitch, tc and turn

Try it on to check whether the opening fits snugly around your thumb. If it's still too wide, work another round. Repeat.

If you ended on an inside round, turn your work before moving on to part V. If your last round was an outside round, don't turn, but go on working in the same direction. Part V will only be worked from the outside.

Part V
Now the opening is just wide enough to fit snugly around your thumb. Remove all markers except end marker.
Round 1: sctbl to end marker
Round 2: sc to end marker
Repeat round 2 three more times (or until the thumb is as long as you'd like it).
End with a slip stitch into the next stitch.

Weave in ends.
Make two.





Freitag, 3. November 2017

Pulswärmer "Triangulation" - Gratis-Strickanleitung

Bernadette von „Törtchens Blog“ hat sich die Mühe gemacht, die Anleitung für die Triangulation Wrist Warmers in Deutsche zu übersetzen. Ganz herzlichen Dank dafür!

Dabei hat sie viele, viele Fehler in der Originalanleitung gefunden, die ich daraufhin verbessern konnte. Auch dafür vielen herzlichen Dank! Ihre Erfahrungen hat sie in diesem Blogpost verarbeitet.

Die deutsche Gratis-Strickanleitung als PDF gibt es hier.

The (corrected) original pattern in english is available here.
Die (korrigierte) Originalanleitung auf Englisch gibt es hier.


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This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



Donnerstag, 2. November 2017

Jeans and Old Lace

After knitting quite a few socks with intarsia in the round (e.g. here or here), I wanted to apply this technique to fingerless gloves. I also wanted to challenge myself a bit by knitting lace - something that usually requires lots of concentration on my part ... and with this lace pattern, it did!

The result is an elegant pair of fingerless gloves in two colors with a delicate lace pattern on the back of your hand that stands out because it is knitted in a contrasting color. The palm side is knitted in plain stockinette stitch using the main color.


If you're a beginner at knitting, you'd probably want to start with a normal "loom-style" pair of fingerless gloves with a lace pattern that's not quite as challenging (e.g. this one). Plus, if you knit intarsia in the round for the first time, it can be a bit fiddly.

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This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • about 35 to 45 grams of fingering weight yarn in two colors - I used about 10 grams of grey yarn (CC) and 30 grams of blue yarn (MC), I'd advise to use a solid color as CC to make the lace pattern stand out
  • 2.5mm circular knitting needles - I used the magic loop method, but you can use dpns, too - I also used dpns to knit the thumb
  • a stitch holder to hold your thumb stitches - e.g. scrap yarn
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Techniques
  • Intarsia in the round with yarn-overs before turning: as shown in this YouTube video by Julia farwell-clay. Basically you knit back and forth even though your stitches are arranged in the round - and you have to consider rounds in pairs - one RS row and one WS row. You start with your main color (MC) on the RS, then - as in normal intarsia you change (by twisting the yarns) - to contrast color (CC) and knit your CC part, After finishing this you turn your work, make a yarn-over and do the WS with CC, when you get to the MC part you change back as in normal (flat) intarsia to MC.
    Now with MC you work your way on the WS not only to the start of the round, but further to the point where you ended the CC part. Here you p2tog the last MC stitch with the yarn over in CC. Then you turn - again with a yarn over - and do the RS part to the beginning of the round. That's the two round finished.
    When - during the next pair of rounds - you reach the new yarn over on the RS, you have to do an ssk of the last stitch in CC with the yarn over in MC.
    In this pattern the following notation will be used: "MC [k7]; CC [k23]" means knit 7 sts in MC, change to CC and knit 23 sts in CC, i.e. the color is indicated before the knitting instructions - the instructions are in square brackets and a semicolon indicates a change of color.
  • Magic Loop Method: as shown in this YouTube video by KnitPicks.
  • Backwards Loop CO: as shown in this YouTube video by Very Pink Knits.

Gauge and Measurements
One finished mitt measures 19 cm in height and 17 cm in diameter. If you want to adjust the width of the mitts, you can change the number of stitches in MC. If you want them longer, adjust the number of pattern repeats accordingly.
In stockinette stitch 16 sts gave 5 cm in width, and 22 rows 5cm in height.



Construction
Even though this piece is knitted in the round, there is a change of direction after every row. That's because it is knitted in intarsia where one round is knitted from the outside of the sock and the next from the inside. This means that at one point in the round you change the color just as in normal (flat knitted) intarsia knit, i.e. where you twist your two strands of yarn (called color changing point or CCP in the pattern) and at another point you attach the colors while you're turning by knitting together the last stitch of the current round with a yarn-over you did in the round below (called turning point or TP in the pattern).
On the right you can find a schematic of the stitch distribution when knitting with the Magic Loop technique.

The color changing point never moves, i.e. every stitch is knitted in the same color as the stitch in the row below.


Lace Pattern and Special Stitches
Below you can find a chart of the lace pattern - I used the Bellflowers patten that I found on knittingfool.com.
For the purpose of knitting these fingerless gloves, the last stitch of each WS row (even numbered row) corresponds to the turning point will connect the lace piece to the part knitted in MC, i.e. you do a k2tog of the last stitch with the yarn over you did at the beginning of the round.
Lace Chart (click to enlarge)
  • yo: yarn over
  • k2tog: knit 2 together, right leaning decrease
  • ssk: slip slip knit, left leaning decrease
  • k3tog: knit 3 together, right leaning double decrease
  • sl1 k2tog psso:  left leaning double decrease, alternatively you can do an sssk (slip slip slip knit)
  • k4tog: knit 4 together
  • sl1 k3tog psso: slip
  • no stitch: When there are more decreases than increases in one row, the stitch number decreases. The no stitch symbol is used as a place holder to ensure that the chart is still aligned.
I'd strongly advise to count the stitches on your needles just after you've finished the lace piece (in order to make sure that you've just the right number you need for the next round). I had to tink back quite a few times ...


Instructions

In CC CO19 and in MC CO33 (see illustration 1)
Turn work - do not join in round yet.
Row 0: MC [ * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts bef CCP, p2, k1 ]; CC [ k1, * p2, k2 repeat from * to end] - when crossing the two yarns at CCP, cross in front
From the beginning of the row, divide the stitches into the following three parts: of 22, 26 and 4 sts (see illustration 2). Join in round
Illustrations (click to enlarge)

Ribbing
Round 1 (outside): CC [yo, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from CCP, p2, k1]; MC [k1, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from TP, p2, k1, ssk] - with the ssk, you'll join the last stitch in this row with the yo you did at the beginning - your piece should look similar to illustration 3.
Round 2 (inside): MC  [yo, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from CCP, p2, k1]; CC [k1, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from TP, p2, k1, k2tog] - with the k2tog, you'll join the last stitch in this row with the yo you did at the beginning
Repeat rounds 1 and 2 once more.

Now start the lace pattern:
Round 1 (outside): CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2, yo, k3, yo, ssk yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 2: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]
Round 3: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, k3tog, k3tog, yo, k1, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 4: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 5: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k4tog, yo k3, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 6: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 7: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, k2, ssk, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 8: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]
Round 9: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, k2, ssk, ssk, ssk, yo ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 10: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]
Round 11: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo,  k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2, yo, k1, yo, sl1 k2tog psso, sl1, k2tog, psso, ssk,  yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 12: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 13: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2, yo, k3, yo, sl1 k3tog psso, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 14: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 15: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2, yo, ssk, k2, yo, k1, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 16: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]

Repeat rounds 1 to 16 once more. Then repeat rounds 1 to 6.

Thumb Gusset
For the thumb gusset, the "normal" rounds are slightly altered - i.e. there will be markers put in place and there will be increases along these markers every 4th row. these changes will be printed in boldface.  The rest of the round stays the same - that's why the row numbers are kept (but with an added t for "thumb").
To knit the thumb gusset on different sides of the lace pattern, there will be two versions of round 7 - one for the right hand mitt, and one for the left hand mitt.

Round 7t - first mitt: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, k2, ssk, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k5 pm k2 pm, k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 7t - second mitt: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, k2, ssk, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 7 bef TP pm k2 pm, k to 1 bef TP, ssk]

Round 8t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]
Round 9t: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, k2, ssk, ssk, ssk, yo ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to marker, slip marker, mk1r, k to next m, mk1l, slip marker, k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 10t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]
Round 11t: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo,  k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2, yo, k1, yo, sl1 k2tog psso, sl1 k2tog psso, ssk,  yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 12t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 13t: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2, yo, k3, yo, sl1 k3tog psso, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to marker, slip marker, mk1r, k to next m, mk1l, slip marker, k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 14t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 15t: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2, yo, ssk, k2, yo, k1, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 16t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]

Round 1t (outside): CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2, yo, k3, yo, ssk yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to marker, slip marker, mk1r, k to next m, mk1l, slip marker,  k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 2t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p15, k1, k2tog]
Round 3t: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, k3tog, k3tog, yo, k1, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 4t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 5t: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k4tog, yo k3, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to marker, slip marker, mk1r, k to next m, mk1l, slip marker,  k to 1 bef TP, ssk]
Round 6t: (inside): MC [yo, p to CCP]; CC [k2, p13, k1, k2tog]
Round 7t: (outside):  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, k2, ssk, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to 1 bef TP, ssk]

Repeat rounds 8t to 16t once, then rounds 1t to 7t once, then rounds 8t to 16t once more, and then rounds 1t to 2t. Now there have been 7 increase rows, i.e. you have increased by 14 sts and there are 16 sts between the stitch markers.

Round 3tt:  CC [yo, p2, yo, k2tog, k3tog, k3tog, yo, k1, yo, k2, ssk, yo, ssk, yo, p2 (you should be at CCP now)]; MC [k to marker, put the 16 sts between the two stitch markers on a stitch holder, with backwards loop cast on, CO 2, k to 1 bef TP, ssk]

Now continue in lace pattern rounds 4 to 16.

Upper ribbing 
Round 1 (outside): CC [yo, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from CCP, p2, k1]; MC [k1, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from TP, p2, k1, ssk] - with the ssk, you'll join the last stitch in this row with the yo you did at the beginning
Round 2 (inside): MC  [yo, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from CCP, p2, k1]; CC [k1, * p2, k2 repeat from * until 3 sts from TP, p2, k1, k2tog] - with the k2tog, you'll join the last stitch in this row with the yo you did at the beginning
Repeat rounds 1 and 2 once more.
Bind of in pattern in 5th round.

Thumb
Put the 16 sts from the stitch holder back on your knitting needle(s). I distributed them evenly on two dpns. There is an upper edge just below the backwards loop CO with a gap on each side. In order to close this gap, you pick up some stitches from these gaps which will be decreased over the next few rounds.

Round 1: pick up and knit a total of 8 stitches from gaps and this edge, k15, ssk (i.e. you join the last stitch of this round with the first of the next). -> 23 sts
Round 2: k6, k2tog, k15 -> 22 sts
Round 3: k all
Round 4: k5, k2tog, k14, ssk (i.e. you join the last stitch of this round with the first of the next) -> 20 sts left
Round 5: k19 (i.e. k to end)
Round 6: k all
Repeat round 6 twice more.

Thumb Ribbing
Round 1: * k2, p2 repeat from * to end
Repeat round 1 twice more.
Bind off in pattern.


Make two.
Weave in ends - all 12 of them ... (at least 6 per mitt)



Samstag, 28. Oktober 2017

Knitting Gauge Ruler - Cut Out Template

I don't like swatching and I don't like to count gauge. This is especially clear in early patterns ... where I rarely even listed gauge or the size of the finished product. In fact, quite a few of my patterns are designed explicitely with the view of not knitting a swatch (e.g. these fingerless gloves, these slippers or this hat). They contain instructions like "repeat these rows until the piece is wide enough to fit around your wrists" or similar.

That said, there are also times where swatching and knitting gauge are extremely important - for example when you're knitting a bigger piece that you want to fit (e.g. this top and this tunic). If you skip the swatching and measuring gauge step here, you will probably end up with a piece that does not fit - which basically means that you've been knitting an oversized swatch.

Until recently, I used my measuring tape or a piece of squared paper with a 5 by 5 cm cut out rectangle. Not very neat, but it did the job. Then I saw on social media that there where specialized tools to do this (just google "gauge ruler" to find them) - and nice ones, too. So, I wanted something similar myself. And of course, I wanted to make it rather than just buy it.



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This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



Here are two downloadable PDFs with cut out templates for a gauge ruler. One in A4 size and one in letter size.


Instructions
  1. Print out template on cardstock or paper of the appropriate size. What kind of material you use is basically up to your printer and what kind of material it can handle. Make sure to use "actual size" option.
  2. Check size of your print out. Inside the black lines of the cross, it should measure exactly 10 cm.
  3. Cut out the cross in the middle using a utility knife - just inside the black lines (see picture on the right). Cut out around the octagon; I used scissors for that, but a blade or utility knife will do as well. There are three gauge rulers on one template. So you can have a bit of practice cutting them out - I certainly needed that :)
Use it to count the stitches of your swatch.


Samstag, 21. Oktober 2017

Rainbow Pearls Cowl

I was searching through my stash in order to find something for a new brioche scarf when I found this one beautiful 50 gram skein of Schulana Colorelli - a variegated yarn in a wonderful rainbow palette. I had bought it a few years ago with a view of knitting a pair of fingerless gloves for a friend (who wears bolder colors than I do), but somehow I never got round to knitting them and so the yarn was slumbering peacefully in one of my yarn boxes.

The Rainbow Pearls Cowl is knitted in the round from bottom to top and all in seed stitch. It is comfortably wide around the lower edge and narrows towards the top. It's an easy knitting project that is suitable for beginners. Since it is knitted with needles that are rather big for the yarn weight it has a very soft texture.

As to the name, Perlmuster ("pearl pattern" or "pearl stitch") is the german name for seed stitch.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • 50 grams of Light Fingering weight yarn - I used one skein of Schulana Colorelli (colorway 2) - here's a link to the yarn's Ravelry page.
  • 5 mm circular needles (I used 40 cm long ones), but you can use longer ones if you use the Magic Loop method
  • a 5 mm crochet hook if you use the crochet CO (or - if you want to do another CO method a 6 mm or 7 mm knitting needle for a stretchy CO).
  • two stitch markers - one different from the other
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Techniques and Abbreviations
  • Seed stitch: basically you just switch between one knit stitch and one purl stitch, in the next row, you do a purl stitch over the stitch that appears as a knit stitch in the row below and a knit stitch on the top of last row's purl stitch - here's a YouTube video by Studio Knit that shows how to do seed stitch.
  • k2tog: knit 2 sts together
  • p2tog: purl 2 sts together
I wanted to have very stretchy edges, that meant using CO and BO methods that are quite stretchy. I used the methods listed below. Alternatively, you can use bigger size needles for the CO and BO row.


Size and Gauge
In pattern (seed stitch) and blocked 8 stitches gave about 5 cm in width and 13 rounds 5 cm in height.
The finished cowl is 36 cm high and has a circumference of 92 cm on the bottom edge and 70 cm on the top edge.

Construction
The cowl is knitted in the round and all in seed stitch. It is started at the lower edge and decreased towards the top. Since it's seed stitch all decreases have to be done in pairs - in order to stay in pattern.



Instructions

CO141 sts and join in round - be careful not to twist the stitches and place a stitch marker (the "end-of-round marker)
Round 1: p1, * k1, p1 repeat from * until end of round
Round 2: k1, * p1, k1 repeat from * until end of round
Repeat rounds 1 and 2 six more times

Round 15: p2tog, k2tog, * p1, k1 repeat from * 10 times, place 2nd marker (called "moving marker"),  *p1, k1 repeat from * until end of round
Round 16: k1, * p1, k1 repeat from * until end of round
Round 17: p1, * k1, p1 repeat from * until end of round
Round 18: k1, * p1, k1 repeat from * until end of round
Repeat round 13 and 14 twice more (i.e. you've knitted a total of 22 rounds)

Round 23: * p1, k1 repeat from * until you reach the moving marker, remove marker, p2tog, k2tog, * p1, k1 repeat from * 10 times, replace moving marker, *p1, k1 repeat from * until end of round
Round 24: k1, * p1, k1 repeat from * until end of round
Round 25: p1, * k1, p1 repeat from * until end of round
Round 26: k1, * p1, k1 repeat from * until end of round
Repeat round 25 and 26 twice more  (i.e. you've knitted a total of 30 rounds)

Repeat rounds 23 to 30 eight more times, i.e. you've knitted 10 rounds with decreases and a total of 94 rounds.
Round 95 = Round 1
Round 96 = Round 2
Repeat rounds 95 and 96 once more - or until there are about 5 meters of yarn left over.

Bind off loosely in pattern.

Weave in ends and block gently.